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5 Risk Factors for Tooth Decay

By: | Tags: | Comments: 0 | May 3rd, 2019

Did you know that certain habits and certain types of lifestyles make you more primed for tooth decay down the road?

It’s true. We are the collection of the decisions we make, and what we eat, drink, and the way we live are all choices that we make on a daily basis. Once we start making better choices, the future starts to get brighter and brighter, and the same is true for your smile.

Below Audubon Dental Center goes over 5 common risk factors for tooth decay.

1.) An Affinity for Sugary or Acidic Drinks

Soda, alcohol, and wine are all jeopardizing your smile. Even though your tooth enamel is tough, it can certainly be eroded by sugars and acids that stick around in your mouth. After a hard night of drinking many of us might shirk our brushing responsibilities at the end of the night, which gives your smile a serious gut punch.

2.) Your Snacking is All Over the Place

If you snack at all hours of the day chances are your smile is under fire 24/7. Instead, develop a routine where you brush in the morning and night, but also once during the day. And limit your snacking to where you only do it before you brush, so that your teeth can enjoy being clean for longer periods of time.

3.) Inadequate Brushing Routine

If you’re not brushing for multiple minutes at least twice daily, then you’re going to be more at risk for tooth decay. Make sure to brush in gentle, circular motions with a soft-bristle toothbrush, too! And don’t forget to floss.

4.) Heartburn

Did you know that your heartburn or acid reflux could be hurting your smile? Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and heartburn can cause your stomach acids to flow back up into your mouth (hence the term reflux). These acids work tirelessly to wear away your enamel, which will lead to significant tooth damage and tooth decay.

5.) Eating Disorders

Although we might not hear about eating disorders as much in the media as we did in the 90s, eating disorders are still prevalent in today’s image-obsessed society. Both anorexia and bulimia can contribute to a significant amount of tooth erosion and cause cavities to develop. Not to mention, your stomach acids from repeated vomiting (which in some circles is called purging) come into contact with your teeth, which will dissolve your tooth enamel.

If you believe that you are at risk for tooth decay, it’s a good time to call Audubon Dental Center. Your oral health is inextricably linked to your overall health, after all. Audubon Dental helps entire families lay the foundation for a life of optimized wellness.

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